See these new plays and world premieres on Broadway and off Broadway

Catch all-new shows by veteran theatre writers and new playwrights alike.


New Off-Broadway plays regularly showcase limitless risk-taking, creativity, and excellence, and this year is no different. A couple of all-new plays are premiering directly on Broadway this spring, but there are plenty more at Off-Broadway theatres around the city to explore.

Some of this year's new plays share common themes, including intergenerational struggles, changing friendships, and self-discovery that happens inside a classroom. But with each playwright, and respective casts coming from different backgrounds, each story has its own unique perspective to offer. And what many of these stories have in common is a shared interest in the many different ways people can connect with each other and navigate the world together, whatever that looks like for them. Seeing the world through plenty of different playwrights' and characters' eyes is a great case for seeing more than one of these shows in New York!

Read more about the new plays on Broadway or off Broadway for the very first time — you could be part of the first audiences to see them before they potentially move to Broadway or thrive in productions all over the country. Many have limited runs, so don't miss out. If you're looking for even more new theatre to discover, check out our guide to all the Broadway shows opening soon.

Get tickets to plays on New York Theatre Guide.

New plays on Broadway

Multiple plays that have never been seen in New York are playing on Broadway this season. You can also catch a show that made its Off-Broadway debut long ago, a long-awaited Broadway debut by an established playwright, or a hit London show being seen in New York for the first time.

Leopoldstadt

Tom Stoppard is one of the most legendary living playwrights there is. He's had 18 productions on Broadway and won six Tony Awards, and his 19th is his most personal work to date, Leopoldstadt. Set in and named after the Jewish quarter of Vienna, the show follows multiple generations of one Jewish family from the late 1800s to the mid-1900s. Each family member has a different relationship with their Judaism — some wholeheartedly define themselves by it; others don't — but amid the Holocaust, during which they're all viewed as lesser, they're all forced to reckon with their identity, and their choices impact the next generations.

Get Leopoldstadt tickets now.

The Collaboration

Visual art and performance art combine in Oscar winner Anthony McCarten's The Collaboration. The play is about artists Jean-Michel Basquiat and Andy Warhol, who were different in nearly every way: They practiced different art styles, came from different racial backgrounds, and had a 30-year age gap. But at the recommendation of an art dealer, they were thrown together to create a joint exhibit. The play focuses on their meetings leading up to that exhibit, where they not only created art together, but talked about art, money, and more, developing a tense but indelible professional relationship in the process. Tony nominee Jeremy Pope plays Basquiat, and Marvel Cinematic Universe star Paul Bettany plays Warhol.

Check back for information on The Collaboration tickets on New York Theatre Guide.

Walking with Ghosts

Gabriel Byrne brings his solo show Walking with Ghosts stateside after premiering it in London. In Walking with Ghosts, the award-winning stage and screen actor talks about the key places and people that shaped his life, from his childhood in Ireland to his later life of celebrity. The show is based on Byrne's same-named bestselling memoir, and Walking with Ghosts will play on Broadway for 75 performances only.

Check back for information on Walking with Ghosts tickets on New York Theatre Guide.

Ohio State Murders

Six-time Tony Award winner Audra McDonald stars in Adrienne Kennedy's Ohio State Murders. She plays Suzanne Alexander, a professor who returns to her alma mater to give a lecture on violence in her work. While there, she comes face to face with the violent and destructive force of racism. The show was written in in 1992, but it hasn't appeared on Broadway until now — in fact, it marks 91-year-old Kennedy's Broadway debut as a playwright.

Check back for information on Ohio State Murders tickets on New York Theatre Guide.

Prima Facie

When Emmy Award winner Jodie Comer headlined Prima Facie in London, her performance was dubbed a tour-de-force. Now, she will once again lead this new one-woman show in its Broadway premiere. Comer stars as Tessa, a brilliant and highly skilled defense attorney who knows just how to exploit every weakness in a prosecutor's case. But when she herself is the victim of an assault, she sees the legal system from the other side and realizes how much her case will be picked apart, and her career ambitions and moral compass collide.

Check back for information on Prima Facie tickets on New York Theatre Guide.

High Noon

Based on the 1952 Oscar-winning film, High Noon will be the first Western on Broadway in 85 years. The show follows Marshal Will Kane, who's caught between skipping town with his wife and escaping his enemies, or facing them head-on once and for all. Like the film, the play takes place over two hours in real time.

Check back for information on High Noon tickets on New York Theatre Guide.

New plays off Broadway

The Off-Broadway world is a haven for new plays. Off-Broadway theatres give new playwrights space to experiment with new work in front of small audiences, and that little show you saw off Broadway might soon become the next Broadway hit. Here are the new Off-Broadway plays premiering this year at theatres across the city.

Straight Line Crazy

Ralph Fiennes stars as New York city planner Robert Moses in the U.S. premiere of Straight Line Crazy. He previously originated the role in London, showing Moses at the height of his power in the mid-20th century. The play follows how he used manipulation, charm, and old-fashioned perseverance alike to become one of the most powerful men in the city. His impact on New York is still seen today, as the highways and institutions he constructed are still standing, making Straight Line Crazy's New York engagement a homecoming.

Get Straight Line Crazy tickets now.

Camp Siegfried

Second Stage produces the U.S. premiere of Bess Wohl's latest play, Camp Siegfried. At a picturesque summer camp on Long Island, two teenagers are stumbling into a first romance — but it's all part of a larger plan, even though the teens don't realize it. The camp, based on real-life World War II-era camps run by German groups, is designed to indoctrinate young people into Nazism, and it slowly ruins these young people.

Get Camp Siegfried tickets now.

You Will Get Sick

This world-premiere play from Noah Diaz is going up with Roundabout Theatre Company. Tony and Golden Globe winner Linda Lavin stars in this show about a man who, struggling to tell his family about a major medical diagnosis, hires an older woman to tell them in his place. The aftermath of that decision changes both their lives in profound ways.

Get You Will Get Sick tickets now.

the bandaged place

Another world premiere at Roundabout, Harrison David Rivers's the bandaged place follows Jonah, a man reeling from an assault. Old trauma resurfaces when a former lover shows up in his life, and the only way Jonah can heal is by mending his relationships with his family — specifically, his daughter and grandmother — so they can be there to support him. The main character is a dancer, so his story of healing is told with both words and movement.

Get the bandaged place tickets now.

Baldwin and Buckley at Cambridge

Conceived by the renowned theatre company Elevator Repair Service, Baldwin and Buckley at Cambridge is a verbatim recreation of a conversation between author James Baldwin and conservatist William F. Buckley, Jr., in which they discussed whether “the American Dream is at the expense of the American Negro.” Their debate raises still-timely questions about racism and people's worth in society. In addition to restaging the real debate, the show also includes a fictional scene in which Baldwin discusses these topics with fellow writer Lorraine Hansberry, whose award-winning play A Raisin in the Sun follows Baldwin and Buckley at Cambridge in The Public Theater's season.

Get Baldwin and Buckley at Cambridge tickets now.

Plays for the Plague Year

In March 2020, Pulitzer Prize winner Suzan-Lori Parks decided to write a play every day while the pandemic continued on. All those little stories have now been combined into one theatrical event, Plays for the Plague Year, going up at The Public Theater. By providing an account of one family's day-to-day life during the pandemic's early days, the show speaks to what people worldwide collectively went through and provides inspiration for the future.

Get Plays for the Plague Year tickets now.

I'm Revolting

Playwright Gracie Gardner, a Relentless Award winner, makes her Off-Broadway debut with her play I'm Revolting. Set in the lobby of a skin cancer clinic, it centers on the patients anxiously wondering how much of their body they're going to lose in order to heal, as well as the caregivers and loved ones there for support, equally anxious to know. The show sheds light on the experience of living in a malfunctioning body and explaining it to those who don't truly understand.

Get I'm Revolting tickets now.

american (tele)visions

This world premiere from Victor I. Cazares at New York Theatre Workshop is set in a place and time far, far away (read: a 1990s Walmart). As one woman, Erica, roves the aisles, she reflects on the story of her Mexican American family, an example of where the American Dream meets an American nightmare.

Get american (tele)visions tickets now.

Where We Belong

Indigenous artist Madeline Sayet wrote and performs this autobiographical play at The Public Theater. She discusses her global travels to various nations with histories of imperialism and colonialism, and how although she often felt out of place in these nations, she was comforted by the knowledge that her Native American ancestors made similar journeys centuries ago. The show explores belonging, and where to find one's place in a world that is increasingly connected, yet disconnected from its own history — and present.

Get Where We Belong tickets now.

Becky Nurse of Salem

Sarah Ruhl's newest play, Becky Nurse of Salem, is going up with Lincoln Center Theater. Tony Award winner Deirdre O'Connell stars as Becky, a witch museum worker descended from Rebecca Nurse, a woman accused in the Salem Witch Trials. She finds herself plagued by bad luck and turns to pills, spells, and love to get rid of it, but it might be her past that's looming over her. Becky Nurse of Salem draws parallels between Becky in the modern day and Rebecca from centuries ago, exploring the lasting and intertwining histories of misogyny and witchcraft.

Check back for information on Becky Nurse of Salem tickets on New York Theatre Guide.

Sandra

Take a break from your mystery novel or true crime podcast and get just as hooked on Sandra, a new one-woman thriller show. The titular character's best friend went on a trip to Mexico and never came back, so Sandra sets out to discover what happened. Her quest turns both romantic, as she falls into a love affair, and dangerous, as she starts to uncover what foul play might be afoot. Playwright David Cale and director Leigh Silverman earned a Lucille Lortel Award for Outstanding Solo Show for their last collaboration, 2018's Harry Clarke, so Sandra is poised to be a successful debut as well — that's no mystery.

Check back for information on Sandra tickets on New York Theatre Guide.

The Far Country

Lloyd Suh's play The Chinese Lady earned rave reviews upon its 2022 premiere at The Public Theater. Now, Suh premieres his newest play, The Far Country, with Atlantic Theater Company. The show follows one Chinese family from Taishan, China to California just after the Chinese Exclusion Act has been enacted.

Check back for information on The Far Country tickets on New York Theatre Guide.

Downstate

Bruce Norris is best known for Clybourne Park, his Tony- and Pulitzer-winning companion play to A Raisin in the Sun. He tackles different, but no less difficult, material than redlining and racism in his newest play, Downstate, at Playwrights Horizons. The play is set at an Illinois home occupied by four formerly incarcerated sex offenders. A man shows up to the house to get justice from his childhood abuser, but it becomes difficult to place where justice ends and revenge begins.

Check back for information on Downstate tickets on New York Theatre Guide.

My Broken Language

Based on Quiara Alegría Hudes's same-named memoir, the world-premiere play My Broken Language is going up at Signature Theatre. The show takes place in a Philadelphia barrio in the 90s, where six women share their lives there through spoken word, song, music, and dance. Hudes is a Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright for Water by the Spoonful, and she's also best known as Lin-Manuel Miranda's collaborator on In the Heights.

Check back for information on My Broken Language tickets on New York Theatre Guide.

Letters From Max

In 2018, two-time Pulitzer finalist Sarah Ruhl published a book titled Letters from Max: a Poet, a Teacher, and a Friendship, documenting her correspondence with her late writing student, Max Ritvo. Now, she's adapted that book into a tender stage play, which shows the lessons teacher and student learned from each other, and how they helped each other grow.

Check back for information on Letters From Max tickets on New York Theatre Guide.

The Trees

Tina Satter directs Agnes Borinsky's The Trees at Playwrights Horizons. The show follows a brother and sister who create, by accident, a utopia in the park by their father's house. In a warlike world, they have to figure out how to keep this little makeshift community alive.

Check back for information on The Trees tickets on New York Theatre Guide.

How to Defend Yourself

Playwright Liliana Padilla co-directs her own show at New York Theatre Workshop alongside Tony Award winner Rachel Chavkin (Hadestown) and Steph Paul. It's fitting that a team of women bands together to lead How to Defend Yourself, itself about a team of young women banding together and learning self-defense after their sorority sister is raped. As they strengthen themselves, they tap into rage and desire they didn't know they had and learn how to channel it.

Check back for information on How to Defend Yourself tickets on New York Theatre Guide.

Regretfully, So the Birds Are

Regretfully, So the Birds Are is a world-premiere play from Julia Izumi, described a "farcical tragedy." A fresh take on people's self-discovery quests, the show centers on the Whistler siblings, whose family problems only start at incest, arson, and murder. Amid it all, they're all looking to find something or hold onto something they have — if the birds don't get in their way.

Check back for information on Regretfully, So the Birds Are tickets on New York Theatre Guide.

Elyria

Playwright Deepa Purohit makes her Off-Broadway debut with Elyria, named for the Ohio town. There, two mothers meet who, 20 years and 2 continents ago, had made a life-changing deal. Now, they must confront their pasts and the ways their futures will continue to tie them together from there.

Check back for information on Elyria tickets on New York Theatre Guide.

Bees and Honey

MCC Theater premieres a Washington Heights love story by Guadalís Del Carmen. But it's not a fluffy, smooth romance. The show focuses on the young married couple Manuel and Johaira, who are starting to come face-to-face with the many challenges of life and marriage as they enter new phases in their lives. One question hangs over their heads all the while: Is love enough to get them through it all?

Check back for information on Bees and Honey tickets on New York Theatre Guide.

Dark Disabled Stories

Ryan J. Haddad makes his Off-Broadway debut as a playwright with Dark Disabled Stories at The Public Theater. He also performs this solo show, which chronicles his experiences navigating a world that wasn't designed for him, his cerebral palsy, or his walker. Every performance of this show will feature open captions, audio descriptions, and American Sign Language interpretations.

Check back for information on Dark Disabled Stories tickets on New York Theatre Guide.

Good Bones

Fresh off a 2022 Pulitzer Prize win for his comedic Hamlet adaptation Fat Ham, James Ijames returns to The Public Theater with his newest work, Good Bones. The show explores the impact of gentrification, centering on one couple, Aisha and Travis. Aisha gets an opportunity to renovate an old house in her dream home, a part of a larger project to revitalize her childhood neighborhood. But her contractor, Earl, who also grew up there, doesn't remember the neighborhood as all bad, and he calls out how Aisha's work might displace the people who still call that neighborhood home.

Check back for information on Good Bones tickets on New York Theatre Guide.

The Half-God of Rainfall

Inua Ellams's The Half-God of Rainfall brings together old legends and modern characters in one new, epic myth that takes audiences from a Nigerian village to a U.S. basketball court to Mount Olympus and back. Demi is a half-Nigerian mortal, half-Greek god whose emotions cause the rain to fall and the rivers to flow. But he has another talent: basketball, and when he plays it, he wakes up even more gods living within the land. But when they awake, others are motivated to take a stand against them.

Check back for information on The Half-God of Rainfall tickets on New York Theatre Guide.

Wet Brain

This co-production between Playwrights Horizons and MCC Theater is a world premiere from John J. Caswell, Jr. In Wet Brain, a family has been hardened into wisecrackers after dealing with their patriarch's alcoholism for so long. They still struggle to watch his ruin, though, and the play tells that story — along with how he's convinced he's getting abducted by aliens.

Check back for information on Wet Brain tickets on New York Theatre Guide.

the best we could (a family tragedy)

Manhattan Theatre Club presents the world premiere of the best we could (a family tragedy), a play by Emily Feldman about a father-daughter road trip. Their journey ends up spanning more than just miles and states in this equally funny and emotional story.

Check back for information on the best we could (a family tragedy) tickets on New York Theatre Guide.

King James

Abbott Elementary star Chris Perfetti and Glenn Davis lead the New York premiere of King James off Broadway. They play two vastly different men who, over the course of many years, develop a close friendship thanks to the one thing they have in common: their admiration of NBA legend LeBron James, whose career affects the trajectory of their own lives.

Check back for information on King James tickets on New York Theatre Guide.

shadow/land

The Public Theater first presented Erika Dickerson-Despenza’s shadow/land as an audio play in 2021, and now, it's being mounted as a fully staged production for the first time. The first in a 10-play cycle from Despenza about the effects of Hurricane Katrina on New Orleans, shadow/land centers on a daughter who convinces her mother to sell their family business to minimize the impact of Katrina on them. However, they're haunted by the question of whether they've given up a valuable part of their family legacy.

Check back for information on shadow/land tickets on New York Theatre Guide.

Primary Trust

This world-premiere play from Eboni Booth at Roundabout Theatre Company is all about getting a new lease on life. Kenneth's usual routine — working at the bookstore by day, drinking mai tais at the town tiki bar by night — gets disrupted when he's laid off. With nothing else to do, he finally faces a world he's been avoiding, and his discoveries prove surprising and even funny.

Check back for information on Primary Trust tickets on New York Theatre Guide.

Grass

Branden Jacobs-Jenkins writes and directs his world-premiere play at Signature Theatre. The main character is an actor who has no job and just got evicted, so he has to go live with his father on a Texas island. To get there alive, he has to take the long road trip with his mother, with potentially comic results.

Check back for information on Grass tickets on New York Theatre Guide.

A Simulacrum

A Simulacrum is a unique theatrical collaboration between Tony-nominated playwright Lucas Hnath and magician Steve Cuiffo. Storytelling meets sleight of hand in this show at Atlantic Theater Company, which dramatizes what happened when Lucas asked Steve to show him some magic tricks.

Check back for information on A Simulacrum tickets on New York Theatre Guide.