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'Bonnie Parker' to close on the 1 May 2005


The off-Broadway production of Bonnie Parker, now playing at the John Houseman Studio Theatre, will close on the 1 May 2005.

The show opended on the 9 Apr 2005, following previews from the 6 Apr and was originally booking to the 15 May 2005. The production will have played 3 previews and 24 regular performances when it closes.

Bonnie Parker, written and performed by Dixie Lee Sedgwick and directed by Joesph Black, is an historically accurate and intimate study of the love-struck young actress, 'A' student, accomplished speaker - and the 'better half' of the world's most infamous crime team. The 'tiny poet' was a favorite of prominent Dallas officials and attorneys prior to the Depression and membership in the notorious Barrow Gang

"People have an idea who Clyde was," says Ms. Sedgwick, "and we straighten that out; but less is known about Bonnie Parker. What grabbed me was the real story of her downward spiral: People make concessions for love, but how far are you willing to go, and for how long? Bonnie struggled with tough hardships before meeting Clyde," she explains, "and plenty more thereafter."

The shows publicity says "Early films portrayed Bonnie as an evil temptress. Historical accuracy is very important to the show. The detailed facts are more interesting than the various fictions about the outlaws. The play uses Bonnie's poems, some diary entries and letters."

Current interest in these icons is strong: 25 books and 11 documentaries about the Barrow Gang have appeared in the last 10 years, in several languages.

"Ms Dixie dug deep, searching for insight," says the shows director and producer Mr Joseph Black. "Audiences are surprised at the events and character that emerges, because the truth is extraordinary. Bonnie Parker is about love through devastating events, crime and what it does to the mind, and final anticipation of doom," concludes Black.

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