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Off-Broadway Reviews

Read the latest New York Off Broadway reviews on New York Theatre Guide. Discover more information on Off Broadway shows in New York City and beyond. New York Theatre Guide employs multiple critics to ensure a diversity of opinion about Off Broadway shows currently playing. Learn more about recent and past Off Broadway show reviews from New York Theatre Guide. Visit the Broadway page to read Broadway theatre reviews.

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  • Assassins

    If you're triggered by the sight and sound of guns (even prop replicas), it'd be wise to skip the Classic Stage Company's production of Stephen Sondheim's strange and stirring Assassins. Rifles and revolvers get plenty of play. That said, missing this show would be a shame — if you can snag a ticket. Set to open 19 months ago but delayed by the pandemic, director and designer John Doyle's take on this darkly humorous slice of history is tight, insightful, and impeccably performed. It aims,...

  • Baby

    A collection of beautiful Broadway-scale voices roar across the 60-seat performance space of Theatrelab in Manhattan as the musical Baby announces that it is back! The only problem is the show is entirely too much for such a small venue. That theme of too much, or doing the most with the least, is an ever-present issue that Out of the Box Theatrics never resolves in the remount of its 2019 production. But what does "too much" mean? Well, Baby follows three couples ― college sweethearts on the...

  • Ghanaian-American playwright Jocelyn Bioh (School Girls; or the African Mean Girls Play) continues to prove why she is the preeminent queen of African comedy. Exciting the palate of American audiences with works tastier than jollof rice, her new play Nollywood Dreams showcases her wit and masterful pen. Directed by Saheem Ali, the dynamic duo who previously collaborated on Merry Wives of Windsor at the Public's free Shakespeare in The Park, tag team again to bring audiences another hysterical...

  • Trevor: The Musical

    How do you turn a quirky 17-minute flick about a 13-year-old grappling with his sexuality and thoughts of self-harm into an old-school two-act musical? Trevor, an earnest and well-acted but only sometimes satisfying production at Stage 42, provides an answer.Based on a 1994 Oscar-winning short film that spawned The Trevor Project, a 24/7 LGBTQ crisis intervention and suicide prevention group, Trevor arrives off Broadway with that storied past — and evergreen urgency. Bullying, intolerance, and...

  • Photo credit: Kristina Wong (Photo by Joan Marcus)

    In the beginning of the show Kristina Wong: Sweatshop Overlord, Wong gives the audience a trigger warning: "The show takes place in the pandemic." Said by almost any other artist at this point, that statement might be met with an internal groan. After all, we're still living in the pandemic and still deeply traumatized by the past 20 months, what insight can possibly be gained right now? But Wong's delightful and deeply moving one-person show at New York Theatre Workshop may be just what we all...

  • Photo credit: The Visitor (Photo by Joan Marcus)

    There has been much drama around The Visitor, the new Tom Kitt, Brian Yorkey, and Kwame Kwei-Armah musical. The show's opening last year was delayed because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Then when it was scheduled to return this fall, the first two preview performances of the musical were postponed to, per the Public's statement, "accommodate for more time for the company to address questions about race, representation, and identity." Then one of The Visitor's stars, Tony winner Ari'el Stachel,...

  • Photo credit: Emmanuel Elpenord as Eeyore, Chris Palmieri as Tigger, Jake Bazel as Pooh, and Kirsty Moon as Piglet in Winnie the Pooh. (Photo by Evan Zimmerman)

    There are many ways that a live-action production of Disney's Winnie the Pooh could have gone awry. Thankfully, the newly opened Off-Broadway musical adaptation of Pooh has eschewed a theme park approach and focused instead on the story's folksy charm.Anyone who grew up reading the A.A. Milne books or watching the Sherman Brothers-scored movies knows that there is not much of a plot to Pooh. The original stories follow a silly stuffed bear who comes to life and goes on adventures while waiting...

  • Morning Sun

    In one crucial moment of Morning Sun, the new play by Simon Stephens, the main character, Charley, is about to have an abortion. As she's heading to her appointment, one of the characters in the play says, "Something at that precise moment makes you stop. And think. And turn around. And go back to work." Charley decides not to have an abortion. But what the play does not tell you is what exactly made Charley decide to change her life. It's only an amorphous "something." And this lack of...

  • Twilight: Los Angeles, 1992

    Anna Deavere Smith is a singular artist. The transfiguration of journalistic interviews into documentary-style drama, a method Smith pioneered 30 years ago, redefined what it means to tell the truth on stage. Her solo performance style, which favors a kind of channeling over full characterization, encouraged an extension of imagination, essential to considering the questions of social justice her plays confront. Smith's revision of Twilight: Los Angeles, 1992 as an ensemble piece for Signature...

  • The Woman in Black

    I've experienced my share of Halloween-themed theatre (including ones where I was blindfolded). But what I've rarely experienced was a room where audience members screamed in fright from all directions. And they were not screaming because of anything typically scary, such as bloody scenes, murders, or anything ghoulish. Instead, the brilliance of The Woman in Black is its use of old-fashioned jump scares and an immersive soundscape to make audiences shriek and jump in their seats.The Woman in...

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