Broadway Reviews

Read the latest New York Broadway theatre reviews on New York Theatre Guide. Discover more about Broadway shows playing right now and find out more about Broadway theatre in New York City. New York Theatre Guide employs multiple critics to cover a wide range of Broadway shows in order to ensure a diversity of opinion. Scroll through recent and past Broadway show reviews from New York Theatre Guide below.

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  • Mr. Saturday Night

    Summer, or at least a feel of summer stock, comes early with the arrival of the new but tired Broadway musical Mr. Saturday Night starring Billy Crystal.Based on a 1992 big-screen box-office dud that Crystal co-wrote, directed, and starred in, the fitfully amusing story spins around Buddy Young Jr., a has-been comic who lost his lucrative network gig but has never shed his self-sabotaging ways. Then, by fluke, he gets a second chance for professional and personal growth.It's the 1990s when we...

    Nederlander Theatre
  • POTUS

    There's a moment in the new Broadway play POTUS that made me cackle so loud, I surprised myself. It's a blink-and-you-miss-it moment. It occurs as the revolving set for POTUS is turning to a new scene in a woman's restroom. There's a tampon dispenser, and as the lights are still down, you can see the price for tampons: $2.79. Oof. The pink tax weighs heavy on the women of the play, both literally and figuratively. If only the rest of POTUS was as subtle or as smart.POTUS: Or, Behind Every Great...

    Shubert Theatre
  • "WOW!" I thought to myself as my body leapt to its feet on its own volition to applaud A Strange Loop. "This must be how people who saw the first performances of Show Boat, Oklahoma!, Company, Rent, or Hamilton felt." Though I've witnessed and studied the innovations in each of those musicals, none of them are as revolutionary as what Michael R. Jackson has accomplished with his Pulitzer Prize-winning musical, now making its Broadway debut.That is thanks to his splendid writing and...

    Lyceum Theatre
  • The Skin of Our Teeth

    The dinosaur earned its entrance applause. Thornton Wilder's play The Skin of Our Teeth, a fantastical tragicomedy about the end of the world, calls for a dinosaur and a woolly mammoth. Typical productions have actors donning animal costumes. But the new Broadway revival of The Skin of Our Teeth goes full Jurassic Park (with the budget to match), with a gigantic brontosaurus, puppeteered by three people, lumbering onto the stage. A one-person-controlled woolly mammoth follows closely behind....

  • Theatregoers seeking thrills at the revival of Funny Girl aren't kept waiting. The musical about the real-life comedian Fanny Brice, back on Broadway for the first time since its 1964 premiere, instantly delivers delights in its exhilarating overture. Melodies glide from one instrumental earworm to the next: the rousing "I'm the Greatest Star" to the tender "People" to the defiantly upbeat "Don't Rain On My Parade." Whistle-wetters don't come much better. And when all is said and sung, it's as...

    August Wilson Theatre
  • Hangmen

    "If they've got to go, they've got to go by the quickest, the most dignified, and the least painful way of going as possible," says Harry (David Threlfall), the former hangman determined to make the horrificness of capital punishment sound honorable.Martin McDonagh's dark comedy Hangmen, directed by Matthew Dunster at Broadway's Golden Theatre, tries to do too many things. The play, which first premiered in London in 2015 ahead of a sold-out Off-Broadway run in 2018, attempts to battle with, and...

    Golden Theatre
  • for colored girls

    Ntozake Shange's powerful paean to Black women, for colored girls who have considered suicide/when the rainbow is enuf, returns to Broadway in a bold revival that burns intensely, though with little nuance. As directed and choreographed by the much-lauded dancemaker Camille A. Brown, this production places an exclamation point at the end of its title, as if to claim that it will punch through every moment of grief until all that is left is celebratory victory. While that approach serves as a...

    Public Theater
  • How I Learned to Drive

    How does one stage a traumatizing play that focuses on grooming, pedophilia, misogyny, and incest? In the case of Paula Vogel's Pulitzer Prize-winning play How I Learned to Drive, which just premiered on Broadway at the Samuel J. Friedman Theatre, Mark Brokaw has opted to direct the most painful moments with a "folks say the wackiest things" shrug. That incongruously lighthearted approach magnifies How I Learned to Drive's horror without investing the words with greater meaning. And what words...

    Samuel J. Friedman Theatre
  • The Minutes

    In The Minutes, a backloaded button-pusher about power, history, and self-preservation, playwright Tracy Letts lifts the curtain on an ordinary closed town council meeting for a group portrait of American democracy at work. No shocker: It's not a pretty picture.This 90-minute work was first seen in 2017 with Steppenwolf Theatre Company in Chicago and briefly on Broadway in 2020 before the pandemic pause. Set in the vividly named and vaguely situated Big Cherry, the setting could be anywhere in...

    Studio 54
  • American Buffalo

    Staging American Buffalo in the woke era of 2022 is a brazen choice. The third Broadway revival of David Mamet's 1975 play is now open after being put on hiatus in 2020 in response to the Covid-19 pandemic. Now, nearly two years later, the production playing at the Circle in the Square puts the controversial playwright and his chaotic play about three crooks back in front of audiences during a time when patrons are calling for new and diverse works. What comes of this is a cluttered repurposing...

    Circle in the Square Theatre

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