Some Girl(s)

  • Date:
    June 1, 2006

    Written by: Neil LaBute
    Directed by: Jo Bonney
    Cast: Eric McCormack (Guy), Maura Tierney (Bobbi), Brooke Smith (Sam), Judy Reyes (Tyler) and Fran Drescher (Lindsay)
    Synopsis: Set in four different city hotel rooms (Seattle, Chicago, Boston and Los Angeles), the play follows a soon-to-be-engaged man as he pays a last visit to four ex-girlfriends before taking the plunge.
     

    What the critics had to say.....

    BEN BRANTLEY of the NEW YORK TIMES says �The visual joke of Neil Patel's single Hotel Anonymous set, which alters minimally from scene to scene, backfires, since it underscores not only the repetitiveness of Guy's love life but also the redundancy of the writing.�

    CLIVE BARNES of THE NEW YORK POST says "His play (Neil LaBute's) lies on the stage floor as flat as a pancake. It's a total waste of an evening."

    MICHAEL SOMMERS of the STAR-LEDGER says "Makes little dramatic impact."

    JACQUES LE SOURD of THE JOURNAL NEWS says "Perhaps LaBute has jacked up our expectations with his previous, pitiless dissection of men and women in ("The Shape of Things," "In the Company of Men" and "The Mercy Seat"), but this one just doesn't measure up."

    ROBERT FELDBERG of The RECORD says "This is a LaBute effort, though, in which the victimizer is profoundly uninteresting, as unexplored and two-dimensional as his victims. It's a work unlikely to stir much controversy. Tedious plays seldom do."

    JUSTIN BERGMAN of the ASSOCIATED PRESS says "Sharp and caustic play. LaBute's words cut and wound but they are also incredibly funny, and at times poignant."

    ALEXIS GREENE of the HOLLYWOOD REPORTER says "Some girls get revenge, and some guys deserve what they get. That's the message in Neil LaBute's entertaining, sleekly written new comedy."

    DAVID ROONEY of VARIETY says "Clearly, he (Eric McCormack) knows his way around a stage, and there's nothing wrong with his work here. But the challenge for any sitcom actor indelibly stamped with the traits of a long-running character are made more manifest by the limitations of LaBute's writing."

    External links to full reviews from newspapers

    New York Times
    New York Post
    Journal News
    The Record
    Associated Press
    The Hollywood Reporter
    Variety