Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, starring Laurie Metcalf & Rupert Everett, has officially closed

The Broadway revival, directed by Joe Mantello, will no longer resume performances at the Booth Theatre.

Patsy Ferran, Rupert Everett, Laurie Metcalf & Russell Tovey

Due to ensuing cast scheduling conflicts amid the current lockdown on Broadway, the 2020 Broadway revival of Edward Albee's Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, directed by two-time Tony Award winner Joe Mantello, will no longer continue performances when theaters re-open on the Great White Way.

The production began previews on March 3, 2020 at the Booth Theatre and was supposed to celebrate an official opening on April 9, ahead of a limited engagement through August 2, 2020. The production played a total of 9 preview performances.

The star-studded cast was led by two-time Tony Award and three-time Emmy Award winner Laurie Metcalf (as Martha), two-time Golden Globe & three-time Olivier Award nominee Rupert Everett (as George), Russell Tovey (as Nick), and Olivier Award winner Patsy Ferran (as Honey).

Synopsis: "Who's Afraid of Virgina Woolf? explores the tensions and the complex nature of the marriage of a middle-aged couple named Martha and George. The play is set late one evening, following a university faculty party, as they invite a younger, unsuspecting couple, Nick and Honey, back to their house and draw them unwillingly into their frustrated and bitter feud."

The creative team featured scenic design by Tony Award nominee Miriam Buether, lighting design by nine-time Tony Award winner Jules Fisher & three-time Tony Award winner Peggy Eisenhauer, and costume design by Tony and Academy Award winner Ann Roth.

Edward Albee's Who's Afraid of Virgina Woolf? first premiered on Broadway in the fall of 1962 and went on to pick up a total of 5 Tony Awards at the 1963 ceremony, including 'Best Play.' New York audiences were stunned with its "radical, provocative, and unflinching portrait of a marriage," which allowed Edward Albee to be instantly celebrated as the most important American playwright of his generation. After an acclaimed 1966 film adaptation, starring Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton, subsequent Broadway revivals were staged in 1976, 2005, and 2012, with this 2020 production marking the play's fourth Broadway revival.

(Photo credit: DKC/O&M)