New York 

Theatre Guide for reviews, tickets and listings
NEW YORK THEATRE GUIDE - ONLINE
HOME
Broadway Theatre Review

Waitress

Three Stars


Photo by Joan Marcus
Keala Settle, Jessie Mueller & Kimiko Glenn in Waitress
Keala Settle, Jessie Mueller & Kimiko Glenn in Waitress
More Production Photos

Review by Tulis McCall
30 April 2016

Waitress is a musical that will leave you fahklempt, because of Sarah Bareilles’ sublime music, but seriously unsatisfied with the decision to overstuff this story.

There are a few basic and necessary ingredients in writing a story. On the one hand there is the three character rule. Two main characters, one of whom – the primary – is driving the piece (Romeo tumbles for Juliet), and a third character whose presence affects the plot. Romeo kills Mercutio and things go south. We see this all the time in every single show on TV. Every. Single. One. Then you have your actions: discover, deliberate and determine. Also in every TV script. These are basics that date back to a seriously long time ago. Way long. And they are basic because they work. They work so well that when you see a show that feels off you can go directly to these rules and see where the applecart tipped over.

In this case I picture this esteemed tribe of artists sitting around the worktable and considering what to cut. I saw this show in Boston and it was ripe for scissoring back then. I picture the conversation went something like, “Well, we could cut the song about dating.” And the reply, “Oh but I love that song. And she nails it.” “OK. How about the one where she defends her love life.” “Nope. We need that one because she’s been silent up till then.” And on and on and on. In the end everything stayed because all the elements were too dear. No one had the laser vision to make the cuts. Even the song “I Love You Like A Table” – the title speaks for itself…

To use the pie analogy that begins the show, this team took sugar, butter, flour and added chocolate, cinnamon, lemons, ginger, molasses, minced meat and… you get the idea.

On the plus side of everything is Jesse Mueller whose skill at delivering a whole universe in a song is astonishing. Her range is stratospheric and her heart is in every note. As Jenna, she is the waitress who supplies Joe’s Diner with pies that are not just pies. Each one is life. “Deep Dish Blueberry Bacon” “Betrayed by My Eggs Pie”. Some are real, others are fantasy, like “My Husband’s A Jerk Chicken Pot Pie”.

Jenna is one of those women who never gets a leg up. The kind of woman who will not be able to afford a ticket to this show. She married because there was not much else to do. And now her husband has devolved into a self-pitying Neanderthal named Earl (Nick Cordero). At work Jenna is buoyed up by the other waitresses. Dawn (Kimiko Glenn) is a perky waif who would like to be in love but has no idea how to do it. Becky (Keala Settle) is a woman with a lot of mileage who still has plenty of tread on her tires. The cook Cal (Eric Anderson) is a monosyllabic soul of hidden substance. The owner Joe (a delightful as always Dakin Matthews) wears gruff like an impenetrable suit and misses nothing. His solo "Take It From An Old Man" left the audience moved so much we almost forgot to clap. Then there are the customers who dance and sing through life.

In other words there is nothing new here. Except for the arrival of the local gynecologist Dr. Pomatter (Drew Gehling) to whose office Jenna bolts when she learns she is pregnant with a child she does not want because a) it is Earl’s and b) she is pretty certain she will mess up being a mother. The highly improbable relationship that develops between doctor and patient is made plausible, once again, because of the music. Their several duets are exquisite, and when it comes to being funny, Gehling walks away with the trophy.

Eventually Jenna gets her courage back, and the balcony erupts with applause. Not so much in the orchestra where I imagine there were a lot of women seeing themselves on that stage: in an unhappy relationship with future prospects looking dim. The walking wounded.

And that is where the bravery of this show lies: in the tale of a woman who is living her life by putting one foot in front of the other every day. She has dreams. In this show a dream does not make you delusional. A dream is a soft place to land.

And in the end that is why we cry and that is why we cheer. And that is why I will go to Tower Records (gotcha) and get the cast recording. I cannot wait to hear these songs again.

(Tulis McCall)


What the popular press said...

"In Jessie Mueller, who plays Jenna, that hard-working waitress, this agreeable if unexceptional musical... has the kind of vital ingredient any show would benefit from."
Charles Isherwood for New York Times

"A big-hearted but overwrought new musical about an everyday woman."
Joe Dziemianowicz for New York Daily News

"In a rare case of an adaptation besting its source material, the new musical is an improvement on the 2007 movie it’s based on. From score to casting, book to staging, everything comes together with a deceiving ease."
Elisabeth Vincentelli for New York Post

"Fresh and delicious, Waitress has an excellent ratio of sweet to tart; supporting characters who provide crustiness (Dakin Matthews’s grumbly store owner) and flakiness (Christopher Fitzgerald’s loony admirer of another waitress); and cooked-to-perfection staging by Diane Paulus. The whole dish is—please forgive me—love at first bite."
David Cote for Time Out New York

"Take terrific songs by Sara Bareilles, mix them to a story by Jessie Nelson that isn't too sugary, bake that with intimate, understated direction by Diane Paulus and top it off with a powerhouse performance by Jessie Mueller."
Mark Kennedy for Associated Press

"A tasty slice of pie for those with a sweet tooth."
David Rooney for Hollywood Reporter

"Sara Bareilles has written a charming score that suits the quirky material and Mueller’s dazzling voice and endearing personality."
Marilyn Stasio for Variety

External links to full reviews from popular press...

New York Times - New York Daily News - New York Post - Time Out - Associated Press - Hollywood Reporter - Variety

Production Details
Venue: Brooks Atkinson Theatre
Genre: Musical
Previewed: 25 Mar 2016
Opened: 24 Apr 2016
Book: Jessie Nelson, based upon the motion picture written by Adrienne Shelley
Music & Lyrics: Sara Bareilles
Director: Diane Paulus

Synopsis: Jenna, a waitress and expert pie maker, is stuck in a small town and a loveless marriage. When a baking contest in a nearby county offers her a chance at escape, Jenna must weigh her commitments against a rare shot at freedom and recognition. Her customers, co-workers, and the town’s handsome new doctor all offer her conflicting recipes for happiness – but Jenna must ultimately decide for herself.

Opening Cast: Jessie Mueller (Jenna), Drew Gehling (Dr. Pomatter), Nick Cordero (Earl), Keala Settle (Becky), Dakin Matthews (Joe), Christopher Fitzgerald (Ogie), Eric Anderson (Cal) and Kimiko Glenn (Dawn)
Click here for latest cast & more details...

Advertisement


Buy 

Broadway 

Tickets New York 

Hotels
Top of page
Review Index
Return to previous page


DISCLAIMER : Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained in these pages. We accept no responsibility for any errors.

© Copyright: all rights reserved
newyorktheatreguide.com