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Michael Moore: The Terms of My Surrender

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Five Stars


Photo by Joan Marcus
Michael Moore in The Terms of My Surrender
Michael Moore in The Terms of My Surrender
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Review by Margret Echeverria
August 18, 2017

“How the fuck did this happen?” Michael Moore asks in the first moments of his Broadway show directed by Micheal Mayer, The Terms of My Surrender, as he stands in front of a huge projection of the face of our current commander in chief. As I look around me in the theatre, there is a cautious nodding of heads. Are we among friends here? "Only once in the last thirty years has a Republican won the popular vote for President," Moore reminds us. "The people didn't want this." Oh. Okay. Maybe it is safe to nod in this room. There was a wild-eyed protester outside screaming something about peace with Putin and taunting us to engage with him as we came in, so we're all a little tense.

Let's be clear: This is a big theatre; chances are there are people in this room who disagree about politics to the core of their beings as if it were religion. But soon Moore calls for us to relate to one another over the most tender of wounds reminding us that, if a loved one died tonight, most of us would struggle to find five hundred dollars to fly to a memorial. Loss knows no politics and we have all lost so much in the last thirty years because of politics. We all have these feelings of hopelessness. So, let's talk.

If you own a copy of Stupid White Men, some of the stories told here may be familiar to you. I wanted Moore to get deeper about the current matters sooner. We know he was an anomaly who ran for school board at the age of 18 and won. Good for him. He remembers a time - what? A hundred years ago? - when there was more freedom to dissent.

One could sneak into a Reagan press conference then without being disappeared. I don't know how you manage your public self lately, but I feel like I'm in that scene from Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1978) when Donald Sutherland screams at Veronica Cartwright exposing her as a critically thinking human thereby ending the world. As Moore brings his story to the scary of now, he reminds us that it was forbidden to be against the Iraq war once the "liberal" New York Times and Judith Miller lead us there. He talks about the aftermath of his Oscar acceptance speech for Bowling for Columbine in which he dared to say he made non-fiction films for these fictitious times.

What followed were threats to his life and actual murder attempts. We had to be quiet while the "Hate Media" got louder and louder, Moore says, and so of course the King of Hate Media became president. Moore points out that we had "Previews of Coming Attractions" in his home state of Michigan when another CEO tried to run the government "like a business." The show gets serious, Moore chokes up about kids poisoned with lead and we are collectively conscious of such insurmountable loss.

Yeah. This feeling sucks.

But as my behavioral therapist yells at me, Whattya gonna doooooooo abaht it??? ... well, Michael Moore has some simple action plans.

Speak up, he pleads with us. He directs everyone in the audience to download an app from 5calls.org to make calling your representative as easy as your morning pee. And, if you are thinking you are too small, Moore insists that we are not powerless because people will rally to help you. He recalls that, when a most unlikely librarian from Englewood New Jersey heard him read two chapters of Stupid White Men at Rutgers when the book was about to be "pulped" - like in a Fargo woodchipper by Murdoch cronies - she rallied a bunch of other librarians who marched around HarperCollins with signs in New York City to put Moore's book on the best seller list for years.

Remember, Moore emphasizes, when you speak up, there is no poll in which the majority of respondents agree with the neo-conservative point of view, so therefore, there are lots of folks who agree with you.

"This is a thinking man's show," my companion and mentor pointed out over wine after the play. "It will be interesting to see how long it can last on Broadway," she said, ordering another. Our current social political situation results much from No Child Left Behind: These kids were never taught to critically think and now they are all grown up and voting ... and going to the theater. So, Michael Moore makes you laugh at the absurdity of it all - with props! - so that we can stop breathing in shallow fear for a moment. He pauses for a live and hilarious game of "Stump the Canadian" with volunteers from the audience and that is not the only chance the audience gets to participate in the show. There is no set script because, to my great pleasure, Moore includes discussion of today's news. Moore hired a Movement Director, Noah Racey to allow us to see some terrifying footwork. The scenic design by David Rockwell combined with the lighting design by Kevin Adams and projection/video design by Andrew Lazarow is grand, colorful and also updated nightly.

And...

there's a girl - a gorgeous, expressive and super talented girl...

and cops... and - SQUEEE! - male strippers!!! So, go get entertained, You Crazy Kids! (Get wise and active, too!)

(Margret Echeverria)


What the popular press said...

"Mr. Moore’s shaggy and self-aggrandizing Broadway showcase... you don’t have to disagree with Mr. Moore’s politics to find that his shtick has become disagreeable with age. “The Terms of My Surrender”... is a bit like being stuck at Thanksgiving dinner with a garrulous, self-regarding, time-sucking uncle. Gotta love him — but maybe let’s turn on the television."
Jesse Green for New York Times

"An engaging solo selective memoir... Sure, there’s Trump-bashing. But at its heart the show is about delivering an urgent, if familiar, message: Everyone must get involved in social and political issues, because one person can work wonders. Moore, 63, is living proof."
Joe Dziemianowicz for New York Daily News

"'The Terms of My Surrender' reveals Moore to be a warmly funny and engaging raconteur, presiding over an evening of surprising emotional depths."
Frank Scheck for Hollywood Reporter

"Standing alone on stage in his signature sneakers and beat-up baseball cap – and with a giant American flag at his back — Moore fires up the faithful to revolt against Trumpland and other indignities of our mad, mad world. (“We’re in the French Resistance, now!”) But for someone who thrives on righteous political indignation through books, tv shows, and especially his award-winning film documentaries like “Bowling for Columbine” and “Roger & Me,” he makes his revolutionary pitch with surprising sweetness."
Marilyn Stasio for Variety

External links to full reviews from popular press...

New York Times - New York Daily News - Hollywood Reporter - Variety

Production Details
Venue: Belasco Theatre
Genre: Solo Show
Previewed: Jul 28, 2017
Opened: Aug 10, 2017
Closed: Oct 22, 2017
Writer: Michael Moore
Director: Michael Mayer

Synopsis: So, the question is posed: 'Can a Broadway show take down a sitting President?' Well, it's time to find out. In a time like no other in American history, and with a sense of urgency like never-before, Michael Moore comes to Broadway for the first time in an exhilarating, subversive one-man show guaranteed to take audiences on a ride through the United States of Insanity, explaining once and for all how the f... we got here, and where best to dine before crossing with the Von Trapp family over the Canadian border. Performed live each night just blocks from Trump Tower, The Terms of My Surrender will, like Moore's films, feature the wry, satirical humor of one of America's iconic political observers and all-around-sh1t-disturbers, a fearless Midwesterner not interested in taking any prisoners. Audiences are in for one surprise after another.

Cast: Michael Moore

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